Home Health First Aid

First Aid

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs: Your Options

The truth is, we do not have a perfect solution for cranial cruciate ligament tears in dogs. Research is constantly evolving and we are still in search of the perfect fix. In humans, a synthetic or biologic ligament is placed where the damaged ligament used to sit. This was tried in dogs, but the outcomes were never good. The replacement ligaments were just not well tolerated. Consequently, something different had to be done.

A New Bone Cancer Vaccine for Dogs

Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone tumor diagnosed in dogs, affecting an estimated 10,000 dogs each year in the U.S. alone. Too many owners are aware that this disease can be extremely aggressive with a poor prognosis.

Liver Disease in Dogs

Signs of liver disease can include lethargy, decreased appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, bruising of the skin (small patches of bruising are called petechiae; larger patches are called ecchymoses), abdominal distention, weakness, and a yellow tint to the skin and gums (called jaundice or icterus).

Teach Your Dog to Relax Around Bees

Just like a good skunking doesnt stop most dogs from going after those black-and-white critters again the next time (darn it!), there are many dogs who seem goaded into more intense bee-chasing behavior after an unfortunate encounter of the stinging kind. Conversely, there are also dogs who become literally phobic about all small, flying creatures after a stinging incident. Then there are those who develop an obsessive-compulsive behavior known as fly-snapping.

Dog Stung By A Bee? Here’s How to Treat It

Hives, wheals, and welts are a moderate reaction to stings. Just like their human counterparts, dogs who have been stung can break out in unsightly hives. These are usually very itchy and uncomfortable. The first sign often noticed is the dog rubbing along furniture or scratching at the face and eyes. The hives may manifest as bright red streaks or lumps all over the body or be confined to a single place.

Dog Hiccups

Dogs get hiccups. Who knew, right? It turns out that this is a fairly common occurrence, especially in puppies. But what causes dog hiccups, and are there ever cases in which they actually indicate a medical problem?

Joint Supplements for Dogs

If your dog has been diagnosed with a joint disease such as arthritis, then youre probably no stranger to the world of joint supplements for dogs. Just visit your local pet store, and you will see that options abound. The choices can be confusing. There are chews, powders, and even diets that claim to improve canine joint disease. But which of these supplements are legitimate, and how can you tell?

Reporting Dogs’ Adverse Reactions is Your Duty

It seems that is rare for a week to go by that we dont hear about - or even experience - yet another pet illness or reaction to animal food, drugs, vaccines, or pesticides. At times, Whole Dog Journals articles and blog posts will include the advice to report any adverse events. And its excellent advice - so heres when, how, and why you should report these events.

Comfort Your Dog

There is absolutely no evidence, not one bit, suggesting that providing comfort and security to a distressed dog causes the dogs anxiety or fear to increase. Why then, does this myth persist among dog owners and even with some trainers? Why are owners still advised to ignore their dog when he is distressed or anxious or fearful, as if providing any attention to the dog will reinforce those emotions?

Distemper in Dogs

The clinical signs of distemper in dogs occur in stages and in three main body systems: the upper respiratory tract, the gastrointestinal tract, and the central nervous system. Initially, a dog may show signs consistent with upper respiratory disease: coughing, sneezing, high fever, lethargy, and nasal and eye discharge.

Can I See Your Dog’s ID?

It is wise to make sure your dog is always wearing identification, with up-to-date contact information! Ideally, your dogs tags have enough information that anyone who might find your dog could contact you directly, 24/7, in the event that she darts out, gets lost on a hike, etc. There are many options for you to employ!

Torn Cruciate Ligaments in Dogs

A cranial cruciate ligament injury in a young, healthy dog is typically an athletic injury. In older dogs, it is usually an injury of chronic wear and tear. This explains why its so common for a dog who has damaged the CrCL on one side to then tear it on the other side. When you take one back leg out of commission, the work load shifts to the other, increasing the strain on the ligaments of the good leg.

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