Home Health Cancer

Cancer

Osteosarcoma: Causes, Diagnosis, and Treatment

Osteosarcoma (OSA) has been found in every vertebrate class and has even been identified in dinosaur fossils, but it appears to be more prevalent...

Mast Cell Tumors

Mast cell tumors (MCTs) are the most common form of malignant skin cancer that occurs in dogs, accounting for about 14 to 21 percent...

A New Bone Cancer Vaccine for Dogs

Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone tumor diagnosed in dogs, affecting an estimated 10,000 dogs each year in the U.S. alone. Too many owners are aware that this disease can be extremely aggressive with a poor prognosis.
canine cancer patient

Mast Cell Tumors in Dogs: Is It Always Cancer?

Mast cell tumors (MCTs) are one of the most frequent skin cancers seen in dogs. Mast cell tumors are the reason why careful monitoring of any skin growths is essential for maintaining a healthy canine. Any new masses on the skin should be evaluated by your veterinarian. In regards to MCTs, there are several predisposed breeds including Boxers, American Staffordshire terriers, and pit bulls.

Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Weight loss may be the first sign of cancer in dogs and can be easy to miss at home. As your dog ages, your veterinarian will likely recommend bloodwork, urinalysis, and other diagnostics. These can detect changes in organ function, possibly indicating cancer.

Hemangioma in Dogs

The cause of hemangiomas is idiopathic (unknown). These growths usually don't appear until at least middle age. Thin-skinned, light-colored breeds often experience hemangiomas. You'll most likely find a hemangioma on the dog's trunk or legs, especially hairless areas like the lower abdomen.

Reduce Your Dog’s Cancer Risks

Veterinary oncologists say that cancers in humans and in dogs are incredibly similar, in terms of growth and prognosis. That's good news for both species, as research of human or canine cancer may yield insight about and new treatments for this deadly disease. In addition, many of the tactics that reduce the incidence of cancer in humans, veterinary oncologists say, can be used by pet owners to reduce the chances that their dogs will develop the disease. Here are four things you can do to help prevent cancer in your dog.

New Hope for Treating Osteosarcoma On the Horizon

Many dogs do just fine after amputation necessitated by osteosarcoma. A new vaccine may help them continue to enjoy life even longer.

Best Treatment Options for Canine Lipomas

Uh-oh. What’s this lump? Any growth on your dog’s body deserves attention, especially one that wasn’t there last time you checked. It could be a sebaceous cyst (a sac filled with sebum, a cheesy or oily material, caused by clogged oil glands in the skin), an abscess (a pus-filled swelling caused by infection), or – everyone’s worst nightmare – a cancerous tumor. But in most cases, the lumps we discover as we pet and groom our dogs are lipomas, which are benign (non-cancerous) fat deposits, also known as fatty tumors. An estimated 1.7 million dogs are treated in the United States for lipomas every year, and according to one survey, American veterinarians average 25 lipoma removals annually at a cost to owners of $635 million. Lipomas tend to emerge as dogs reach middle age and increase in number as dogs get older. A dog with one lipoma is likely to get more. Lipomas are most often found on the chest, abdomen, legs, or armpits (axillae). These fatty lumps aren’t painful and they usually stay in one place without invading surrounding tissue.

Studies Have Linked Lawn Pesticides with Canine Malignant Lymphoma

It's a ton of fun to see an athletic, healthy dog sprinting across a sprawling lawn of thick green grass – but could this practice be dangerous to the dog's health? A study presented in the January 2012 issue of the journal Environmental Research concluded that exposure to professionally applied lawn pesticides was associated with a significantly (70 percent) higher risk of canine malignant lymphoma (CML). It's a broad conclusion and light on specifics. The case-control study, conducted between January 2000 and December 2006 at the Foster Hospital for Small Animals at Tufts University's Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, was structured around a 10-page questionnaire that was mailed to dog owners who were having their pets treated at the Foster Hospital; the resulting data came from the owners of 266 dogs with confirmed cases of CML and 478 dogs in two control groups (non-CML cases).

Chemotherapy for Dogs: What to Expect

Cancer. My heart dropped to my stomach. In February 2010 my Border Collie Daisy became one of an estimated six million dogs diagnosed with cancer each year. Chemotherapy. My stomach tumbled to my feet. The diagnosis was scary enough; how could I possibly consider chemotherapy? I had visions of a treatment worse than the disease itself. As it turns out, my preconceptions of chemotherapy were far worse than its reality. Chemo hasn't cured my dog – more on that later – but it's given us more than 18 months (and counting) of joyful, quality time together.

Latest Blog

Dog Food Recalls and Salmonella Contamination

Over the 23 years Whole Dog Journal has been published, we’ve discussed pet food recalls due to contamination with Salmonella a number...

No dog looks as comatose, or as happy, as a dog who is soaking up sunshine on grass in the spring ...

Poor Woody. He doesn’t love her, but she, like all the foster pups, loves him. I have to find a home for her!! ...

Haven’t yet managed to take a picture of the foster dog that doesn’t scream EARS! ...

Balancing on a rail fence! (He jumped off before I could get a shot that showed the fence more clearly... we will try again!) ...

A little drama right at sunset last night. I always pray to be with my dogs if those last golden rays of light break through like that. ...

I love it when they smile in their sleep. #anthropomorphicanimals ...

Best result from several attempts to get six dogs to stay still for one minute ...

“Something moved in the grass, I’m telling you!” ...

Two of these dogs don’t much care for the tractor-mower. One of them is riveted. I’ll bet you can guess which dog wouldn’t stop following me today. ...

Dogs don’t drive! (Except when parked. Why is the driver’s seat so popular with dogs?) ...

Smart foster girl earned off-leash privileges in three days (and got grass-stains on her forehead from somersaulting in the deepgrassrunningjoy) ...

Foster/assess project: So far, 100% adorable. ...

My sister and her three little dogs. Yes, she is one of those women who always carries a purse, and takes hikes in a colorful skirt. And yes, her dogs adore her and even off-leash, rarely get more than a few feet aeay from her. Otto stayed with them while I was on vacation and while happy to see me again, wasn’t THRILLED to ser me again, if you know what I mean. Thank you, Pam and family, for taking good care of him for me. ...

Today’s new friends. You may have guessed I am not at home. ...

Made a new friend today. Very personable. ...

This little service dog may be overweight, arthritic, and off-leash... but I watched him walk with his Vietnam veteran owner through a crowd and never get more than 10 inches from his side. #damngooddog #thankyoubothforyourservice ...