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The best in health, wellness, and positive training from America’s leading dog experts

Dog Food Information

Just Because Your Dog Has a Favorite Food Doesn’t Make It Nutritious!

There are hundreds of brands and flavors of dog food out there. You can find them everywhere, from the corner convenience store to the members-only warehouse center to the hard-to-find health food store for pets. And by golly, you’ve tried what seems like all of them! Yet you’re still not sure which are the best ones for your dog. On the other hand, your dog seems to have a definite opinion about it, and really prefers one of the less expensive grocery store brands. That’s great, you think, he loves the food and he’s saving me money! But is he? Is your dog’s preference for a particular food a good indication of the quality of the food?

Canned Dog Food or Dry Dog Food? We’ll Help Break it Down

Caring guardians of companion canines often wonder whether one form of commercially prepared food – kibble or canned – is better than the other. The truth is, both types of food have relative advantages and disadvantages in terms of palatability, digestibility, and necessity for preservatives or other chemical additives. While they generally meet the same chemical composition standards in terms of vitamins, minerals, and amino acids, these types of food provide very different nutritional value.

It’s All In How You Make It

reduce pesticide residues by washing well

Finding The Best Dog Food Diet

Every commercial dog food maker includes macronutrients – proteins, fats, and carbohydrates – in varying percentages in their products. But in recent years, some companies have begun formulating dog foods with higher percentages of protein and/or fat. While there is no regulated definition of the word premium
Nutrition for dogs is a bit of a mystery with the correct ration of carbohydrate, protein, and fats highly depending on the individual dog.

Nutrition for Dogs: Fat, Protein and Carb Levels in Dog Food

There are many kinds of proteins, which are made of complex, organic compounds. Each type of protein consists of a varying mix of amino acids attached to each other with peptide bonds. Dogs can manufacture some of the 22 amino acids found in their bodies, but need a dietary source for others. Amino acids build body proteins, which in turn function as components of enzymes, hormones, a variety of body secretions, and structural and protective tissues.

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