Features October 2014 Issue

What To Do If Your Dog Has Worms

Many puppies, like this shelter ward, owe their jolly round tummies to a heavy infestation of roundworms, which can infect the pups in utero and through the milk of their infected mother.

What To Do If Your Dog Has Worms

Getting to the bottom of a wiggly matter.

Deworming agents are present in any number of prescription and over-the-counter treatments for dogs and puppies. If your dog shows signs of a gastrointestinal worm infestation, there are all sorts of products available that are made exclusively to rid dogs of various types of worms. But there are also deworming agents included – whether they are needed or not – in many flea and tick treatments and in most heartworm preventive drugs; in fact, it’s sometimes hard to find a minimalist flea treatment or heartworm preventive drug that does not contain dewormers. The question is, is this really necessary? Are intestinal parasites that much of an ongoing threat to most dogs – and their owners?

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