Features September 2016 Issue

Why We Don’t Recommend Electric Fences (Shock Collars)

Most dogs learn to associate the boundary lines of their underground shock fences with getting “zapped.” Unfortunately, this makes many of them associate whatever they saw that drew them toward the boundary – other dogs, kids riding bikes, elderly pedestrians, etc. – with the unpleasant shock. It shouldn’t come as a surprise, then, when they begin to show anxiety or aggression in the presence of these stimuli (whether or not they are near the boundary, and whether or nor they are wearing “that” collar).

Why We Don’t Recommend Electric Fences (Shock Collars)

Invisible fence companies, other shock-collar companies, and trainers who use shock tools, have done a very good job of convincing many dog owners that these tools are effective and harmless, using deceptive terms such as “stimulate,” “tickle,” “e-touch,” and “electronic” to disguise the true nature of the shock. Incredibly, some even claim that they are using positive reinforcement when they use shock.

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