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Double TPLO Surgery for Dogs

As we learned in our independent research and from meeting with multiple veterinary surgeons, the TPLO surgery has become the gold-standard treatment for this kind of knee injury, especially in very large, strong, young, athletic dogs. While waiting for Sirius growth plates to close, we saw firsthand how conservative management worked - and then didnt. We were looking for a treatment option that gave Sirius the best chance at the kind of fun and normal life she deserved, one that would allow her to return to the activities and sports training that she loved.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs: Your Options

The truth is, we do not have a perfect solution for cranial cruciate ligament tears in dogs. Research is constantly evolving and we are still in search of the perfect fix. In humans, a synthetic or biologic ligament is placed where the damaged ligament used to sit. This was tried in dogs, but the outcomes were never good. The replacement ligaments were just not well tolerated. Consequently, something different had to be done.

A New Bone Cancer Vaccine for Dogs

Osteosarcoma is the most common type of bone tumor diagnosed in dogs, affecting an estimated 10,000 dogs each year in the U.S. alone. Too many owners are aware that this disease can be extremely aggressive with a poor prognosis.

Dog Hiccups

Dogs get hiccups. Who knew, right? It turns out that this is a fairly common occurrence, especially in puppies. But what causes dog hiccups, and are there ever cases in which they actually indicate a medical problem?

Joint Supplements for Dogs

If your dog has been diagnosed with a joint disease such as arthritis, then youre probably no stranger to the world of joint supplements for dogs. Just visit your local pet store, and you will see that options abound. The choices can be confusing. There are chews, powders, and even diets that claim to improve canine joint disease. But which of these supplements are legitimate, and how can you tell?

Reporting Dogs’ Adverse Reactions is Your Duty

It seems that is rare for a week to go by that we dont hear about - or even experience - yet another pet illness or reaction to animal food, drugs, vaccines, or pesticides. At times, Whole Dog Journals articles and blog posts will include the advice to report any adverse events. And its excellent advice - so heres when, how, and why you should report these events.

Comfort Your Dog

There is absolutely no evidence, not one bit, suggesting that providing comfort and security to a distressed dog causes the dogs anxiety or fear to increase. Why then, does this myth persist among dog owners and even with some trainers? Why are owners still advised to ignore their dog when he is distressed or anxious or fearful, as if providing any attention to the dog will reinforce those emotions?

Distemper in Dogs

The clinical signs of distemper in dogs occur in stages and in three main body systems: the upper respiratory tract, the gastrointestinal tract, and the central nervous system. Initially, a dog may show signs consistent with upper respiratory disease: coughing, sneezing, high fever, lethargy, and nasal and eye discharge.

Can I See Your Dog’s ID?

It is wise to make sure your dog is always wearing identification, with up-to-date contact information! Ideally, your dogs tags have enough information that anyone who might find your dog could contact you directly, 24/7, in the event that she darts out, gets lost on a hike, etc. There are many options for you to employ!

Torn Cruciate Ligaments in Dogs

A cranial cruciate ligament injury in a young, healthy dog is typically an athletic injury. In older dogs, it is usually an injury of chronic wear and tear. This explains why its so common for a dog who has damaged the CrCL on one side to then tear it on the other side. When you take one back leg out of commission, the work load shifts to the other, increasing the strain on the ligaments of the good leg.
canine cancer patient

Mast Cell Tumors in Dogs: Is It Always Cancer?

Mast cell tumors (MCTs) are one of the most frequent skin cancers seen in dogs. Mast cell tumors are the reason why careful monitoring of any skin growths is essential for maintaining a healthy canine. Any new masses on the skin should be evaluated by your veterinarian. In regards to MCTs, there are several predisposed breeds including Boxers, American Staffordshire terriers, and pit bulls.

Signs of Cancer in Dogs

Weight loss may be the first sign of cancer in dogs and can be easy to miss at home. As your dog ages, your veterinarian will likely recommend bloodwork, urinalysis, and other diagnostics. These can detect changes in organ function, possibly indicating cancer.

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