Features April 2019 Issue

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs: Your Options

The incision for a TPLO is impressively large, but with scrupulous control of the dog’s activity in the days after surgery, most dogs recover quickly – perhaps because they are no longer in pain from their ligament injuries.

Cranial Cruciate Ligament Repair for Dogs: Your Options

Which surgery will best fix your dog’s cranial cruciate ligament tear? Here are the factors to consider in the decision.

The truth is, we do not have a perfect solution for cranial cruciate ligament tears in dogs. Research is constantly evolving and we are still in search of the perfect fix. In humans, a synthetic or biologic ligament is placed where the damaged ligament used to sit. This was tried in dogs, but the outcomes were never good. The replacement ligaments were just not well tolerated. Consequently, something different had to be done.

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