Features February 2018 Issue

How Can You Know What Your Dog is Feeling?

The puppy on the right is not being stubborn, spiteful, balky, or willful – she got spooked by the sudden approach of a bold, bristling Beagle. Forcing her to face the Beagle may frighten her further and cause her to lose trust in her handler.

How Can You Know What Your Dog is Feeling?

Part two of an excerpt from Denise Fenzi’s newest book, Beyond the Basics: Unlock Your Dog’s Behavior.

Dog body language can be quite difficult to read, so it’s important to consider the context when interpreting behavior. Not only do you need to consider the environment (for example, dogs will pant when they’re hot, but also when they’re stressed), you also need to look at all of the body parts together. Although many people attempt to correlate each type of movement with a specific emotion, the easier approach is simply to compare the overall pictures of a distressed dog to a happy dog.

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