Features December 2017 Issue

Feeling Alone in Group Training Class

It’s natural to become disappointed and frustrated when you pay for a group dog-training class and your dog or puppy is too frightened or overstimulated to take part in the lessons on the syllabus. Take a breath, though, and consider that the experience can be used to teach your dog different – and just as valuable – lessons.

Feeling Alone in Group Training Class

The pros and cons of group dog training instruction and tips on how to maximize the experience for your dog.

Group training classes are a mixed bag of pros and cons. And I say this as someone who has made a fair amount of my annual income by teaching group training classes. I also attend group classes with my own dog. By design, the “ideal candidate” for a positive-reinforcement group manners class is the generally happy-go-lucky, emotionally stable, food-oriented dog whose worse transgression is maybe a minor lack of impulse control, simply because he hasn’t yet been taught how to do better – that’s why he’s there.

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