Features October 2005 Issue

Establishing a Good Bite Inhibition

One of the most important things a puppy needs to learn: bite inhibition.

Animal care professionals are fond of saying, “All dogs will bite, given the right (wrong) circumstances.” If that’s the case, how have I managed to suffer only two punctures in a 30-plus-year career working with dogs? Partly through reading and responding to canine body language well enough to avoid provoking an attack (see “How to Save Yourself,” September 2005). Partly, I’m sure, through luck. But largely, I suspect, because many dogs possess a wonderful quality known as “bite inhibition.”

To continue reading this article you must be a paid subscriber.

Subscribe today for instant access to thousands of dog training, health, and nutrition articles and tips. The Whole Dog Journal will...

  • Recommend the best and safest foods and products for your dog.
  • Guide you through the most effective positive dog training methods.
  • Help you understand when your dog is bored, anxious, tired, or hungry. You won't believe some of the signs!
  • Show you the healthiest and most effective homeopathic and mainstream remedies, diets, and medicines.

Your satisfaction to The Whole Dog Journal is guaranteed. Subscribe today to see why hundreds of thousands of dog owners trust us as the #1 source of information.

 

Subscriber Log In

Forgot your password? Click Here.
Already subscribed but haven't registered for all the benefits of the website? Click here.