Is My Dog Depressed?

Depression_dreamstime_88301398.jpg

When a dog is suddenly no longer interested in their favorite activities, whether itís playing Frisbee in the park or chasing squirrels in the backyard, most animal behavior experts will tell you to look for a physical explanation, not a mental-health recommendation. Taking your four-legged friend to the vet for a physical exam should always be the first response to what seems like depression. A change in behavior can usually be attributed to underlying physical conditions like arthritis or pain.   More...

Do Dogs Smile?

wholedogblogpostimage1.jpg

A well-accepted theory among dog behavior experts is that dogs smile because they know that we humans love it. We see our dogs lounging on the rug with their mouths hanging open, lips pulled back, looking utterly satisfied with themselves, and we go ga-ga with praise and pets. Dogs probably also observe their humans smiling at them and among themselves; they know people smiles are inherently positive (at the very least, benign), and that they can communicate amicability by miming that behavior.   More...

When to Worry About Your Dog’s Runny Nose

GettyImages-609954114_fongleon356A.jpg

Itís that time of year again. Runny noses and sneezes abound for us humans, as new plants bloom in the fall. But did you know that your dog can suffer a runny nose too? Dog runny noses are more correctly called nasal discharge. It can run the gamut from clear and watery to thick and purulent. The appearance and frequency of nasal discharge in dogs can tell you much about the underlying cause.   More...

Is Frequent Urination in Dogs Normal?

GettyImages-927397986_PhawatTopaisanA.jpg

If the symptoms your dog exhibits are straining to urinate, frequent, small accidents or repeated, small puddles when going outdoors, a likely cause is a lower urinary tract issue such as a bladder infection, bladder stones, or cystitis (bladder inflammation). Diagnostics will include a urine sample, urine culture, and possibly xrays of the bladder. Some breeds such as Schnauzers are more prone to certain lower urinary tract issues like bladder stones.   More...

Moving with Dogs: Everything You Need to Know

Moving to a new house regardless of whether itís down the street or across the country is stressful for anyone, but for dogs it can be especially confusing and upsetting. I just moved my three dogs (ages 16 years to 21 months, 10 pounds to 100 pounds) from New York City to Portland, Oregon. The move has been a bit hectic, but my biggest priority has been creating stability and consistency for my dogs.   More...

Dog Limping: Possible Causes and Treatments

GettyImages-1034937418_geoffspA.jpg

Dogs are usually active, enthusiastic household members, and as a result, they are prone to injuries. These can range from muscle strains to broken bones to systemic infections. When your dog is limping itís time to consult with a veterinarian. They may have you rest your dog and monitor at home for 24 - 48 hours depending on the severity of the problem. If the limp doesnít improve or worsens, they will likely have you come in for an appointment.   More...

Smoke Inhalation and Dogs

GettyImages-181065024_erick4x4A.jpg

Smoke inhalation is dangerous for all dogs regardless of breed or age, but there are some specific concerns with some breeds. Dr. Loenser explained that dogs with short noses including bulldogs, pugs and boston terriers are especially at risk. Additionally, she explained that very young and very old dogs of any breed can be more fragile and at risk for medical complications from smoke inhalation.   More...

Dog Drooling: The Juicy Truth About Why Dogs Slobber

GettyImages-471643632_WavetopA.jpg

It is not abnormal for your dog to drool sometimes. Pavlov showed in his famous bell experiments that anticipating a meal can make a dog salivate. Fear can also cause dogs to drool, as you will see in a storm-phobic dog. Drooling is a form of heat control for dogs called evaporative cooling. So, the answer is yes! Drooling can be normal and in response to the dogís emotions or environment.   More...

How Much Sleep Do Dogs Need?

GettyImages-942148188_danaibe12A.jpg

Activity can affect sleep time for dogs. Working dogs sleep less than inactive dogs. Inactive dogs also may have unusual sleep/wake cycles. This might be because many dogs are home alone during the daytime, and thus, they sleep. When owners come home, the dog becomes active. This daytime inactivity can lead to wakefulness at night, when the rest of the house is asleep. Itís a good idea to leave interesting toys for your dogs when you are gone for the day. Daily exercise for at least 15-30 minutes also promotes healthy sleep patterns...in everyone!   More...

Planning A Road Trip with Your Dog?

dreamstime_s_5076125A.jpg

Thinking of traveling with your dog? Road trips can be a lot of fun and are a great way to see new and out-of-the-way parts of the country. Road trips with dogs bring unique challenges and require dog-specific prep but are a great way to spend time with your best friend. I just finished a coast to coast road trip with my three dogs (and three cats) to move from Brooklyn, New York to Portland, Oregon. Our road trip took us a total of seven days, and the dogs were relaxed and having fun coast to coast! Here are a few tips and strategies for how to road trip safely with your dogs.   More...

Dog Walking Apps: Are They Safe?

DogWalkingApps2.jpg

When you use a dog walking app service, you are inviting a stranger into your home who you have not vetted. You are handing your four-legged family member, with all his or her unique quirks, to a well-intentioned dog lover who most likely does not have the requisite education and training to keep your dog safe by understanding body language, recognizing early warning signs, knowing how to avoid incident, and what to do should something go wrong. This puts your dog at greater risk.   More...

Frozen Dog Treats: How to Make Pupsicles for Your Dog

pupsicle_dreamstime_m_120269223A.jpg

With high temperatures across the country, pupsicles are an easy and highly customizable treat that can entertain your dogs while keeping them cool and hydrated. Pupsicles donít take the place of making sure your dog is drinking fresh water, but they are a fun way to add more hydration to your dogís day. Here are a few easy popsicle recipes your dog is sure to enjoy.   More...

Ice Cream for Dogs

IceCream_IMG_6022A.jpg

Ice cream, of course, contains milk. And just like humans, some dogs (not all) are lactose-intolerant. If you feed milk to a lactose-intolerant dog, he may experience diarrhea, painful gas, or vomiting. Of course, ice cream is a treat, not a diet staple, so start by giving your dog no more than a spoonful, and wait for a day to see if he has any negative response to the frozen dessert. As long as he does not, he should be able to enjoy a prudent amount as an occasional treat.   More...

10 Human Foods for Dogs

dreamstime_m_116201855.jpg

There are foods people designate strictly for human consumption which our dogs could (and arguably should) be eating regularly too. Yogurt and eggs top that list. Raw honey is a well-known and tasty way to treat canine ailments like kennel cough and topical wounds. And do you personally know a dog who can resist a scoop of peanut butter when presented with one? These are the more widely accepted human foods for dogs, but there are plenty of other great foods to taste-test with your dog.   More...

What Vegetables Can Dogs Eat?

dreamstime_s_11196625A.jpg

My darling baby boy is a 12-year-old German Shorthair Pointer mix. When he was around 6 years old he started to put on some weight. Based on a suggestion from a friend I cut back on his food and added a handful of frozen green beans to his dinner. The vegetable slowed down the gobbling up of his food, added volume without many calories to help him feel full, and easily fit into my budget. The trick worked! My pup slimmed down.   More...