10 Human Foods for Dogs

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There are foods people designate strictly for human consumption which our dogs could (and arguably should) be eating regularly too. Yogurt and eggs top that list. Raw honey is a well-known and tasty way to treat canine ailments like kennel cough and topical wounds. And do you personally know a dog who can resist a scoop of peanut butter when presented with one? These are the more widely accepted human foods for dogs, but there are plenty of other great foods to taste-test with your dog.   More...

Frozen Dog Treats: How to Make Pupsicles for Your Dog

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With high temperatures across the country, pupsicles are an easy and highly customizable treat that can entertain your dogs while keeping them cool and hydrated. Pupsicles don’t take the place of making sure your dog is drinking fresh water, but they are a fun way to add more hydration to your dog’s day. Here are a few easy popsicle recipes your dog is sure to enjoy.   More...

What Vegetables Can Dogs Eat?

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My darling baby boy is a 12-year-old German Shorthair Pointer mix. When he was around 6 years old he started to put on some weight. Based on a suggestion from a friend I cut back on his food and added a handful of frozen green beans to his dinner. The vegetable slowed down the gobbling up of his food, added volume without many calories to help him feel full, and easily fit into my budget. The trick worked! My pup slimmed down.   More...

What Fruits Can Dogs Eat?

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Unfortunately, no fruit is good for dogs to eat because of how high in sugar most varieties are, as Dr. Wismer explains. While fruits like pears and pineapple do provide nutrients to dogs, Dr. Wismer advises that fruit should only be given to your dog as an occasional treat. In other words, it should not make up a significant part of your dog’s diet.   More...

Dog Walking Apps: Are They Safe?

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When you use a dog walking app service, you are inviting a stranger into your home who you have not vetted. You are handing your four-legged family member, with all his or her unique quirks, to a well-intentioned dog lover who most likely does not have the requisite education and training to keep your dog safe by understanding body language, recognizing early warning signs, knowing how to avoid incident, and what to do should something go wrong. This puts your dog at greater risk.   More...

Dog Toothpaste: Is It Necessary?

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Of course, you can’t just pick up your own tube of human toothpaste and start brushing your dog’s teeth. Just like our dogs don’t have the same dietary requirements as we do, dog toothpaste differs from toothpaste for people in several ways. “It’s important to use a toothpaste made specifically for pets, because human toothpaste contains fluoride and detergents that are not meant to be swallowed,” Dr. Linick says. “No matter how brilliant your dog is, you cannot teach him to rinse.” Additionally, dogs tend to really dislike the taste of mint; you might make the teeth brushing experience even more unpleasant for your dog by using your own toothpaste.   More...

Ice Cream for Dogs

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Ice cream, of course, contains milk. And just like humans, some dogs (not all) are lactose-intolerant. If you feed milk to a lactose-intolerant dog, he may experience diarrhea, painful gas, or vomiting. Of course, ice cream is a treat, not a diet staple, so start by giving your dog no more than a spoonful, and wait for a day to see if he has any negative response to the frozen dessert. As long as he does not, he should be able to enjoy a prudent amount as an occasional treat.   More...

Do Dogs Smile?

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A well-accepted theory among dog behavior experts is that dogs smile because they know that we humans love it. We see our dogs lounging on the rug with their mouths hanging open, lips pulled back, looking utterly satisfied with themselves, and we go ga-ga with praise and pets. Dogs probably also observe their humans smiling at them and among themselves; they know people smiles are inherently positive (at the very least, benign), and that they can communicate amicability by miming that behavior.   More...

Tips on Introducing a New Dog

Be sure to reinforce both/all dogs for calm, appropriate behavior in each other’s presence. Your reinforcers should be calming: treats, massage, and verbal praise are good choices; tug and fetch are not. You can use tethers, if necessary, to create calm, and follow Norwegian dog trainer Turid Rugaas’ suggestions to have dogs approach each other in a curving line rather than directly, allowing them to sniff the ground and do other displacement and appeasement behaviors such as looking away, as they choose.   More...

Homemade Dog Food Ingredients: 3 Essential Foods for Dogs

Whole Dog Journal steers away from providing dog guardians with step-by-step recipes for dog food, raw or cooked. We can share expert dog companions’ personal protocols for feeding their dogs home-prepared, but quickly you will realize not only that the perfect dog food recipe does not exist, but that in order for your dog to receive all necessary nutrients, you really need many recipes that include many different whole food ingredients.   More...

Symptoms and Treatment of Foxtail Invasions in Dogs

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While some ?rst aid may be possible in the event of a foxtail wound, in almost all cases you should get your dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Delaying treatment allows the foxtail to do further damage; avoiding foxtail treatment altogether could lead to your dog developing a chronic illness or could even lead to death.   More...

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Dogs can eat avocado flesh, if they like it, without problems. The reason some say not to give avocados to dogs is because avocados are known to contain a toxin called persin, which is quite dangerous to other animals like horses and birds but is in fact harmless to dogs in small amounts. Avocados hold the highest concentrations of persin in their leaves, thick skin, and pits; avocado flesh contains low levels of this chemical – a negligible amount for most humans, and for most dogs too. We don’t eat the leaves, skin, or pits of avocados, so don’t give these to your dog. A few thin slices of fresh avocado over your dog’s dinner, or as a nutrient-rich treat, however, will be fine for your dog, unless of course he has a food allergy to it.   More...

Is My Dog Depressed?

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When a dog is suddenly no longer interested in their favorite activities, whether it’s playing Frisbee in the park or chasing squirrels in the backyard, most animal behavior experts will tell you to look for a physical explanation, not a mental-health recommendation. Taking your four-legged friend to the vet for a physical exam should always be the first response to what seems like depression. A change in behavior can usually be attributed to underlying physical conditions like arthritis or pain.   More...

Whole Dog Journal: Who We Are

For 20 years, Whole Dog Journal has upheld its reputation as a leader in dog companionship and care information. We take our mission statement seriously, and we've gained a lot of respect for that over the years, bringing us more and more new readers every month! However, now we'd like to share with our readers both new and old three aspects of the dog guardianship world you will NOT find in Whole Dog Journal.   More...

Kennel Cough Treatment and Prevention for Dogs

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Anyone who’s heard it will recognize the dry, hacking, something’s-stuck-in-my-throat cough that won’t quit. It’s the signature symptom of canine infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as Bordetellosis, Bordetella, and most commonly as kennel cough. Whatever you call it, tracheobronchitis is one of the world’s most widespread canine diseases. Like the common cold in humans, tracheobronchitis is highly contagious, rarely fatal, and runs its course in a few days. Fortunately, there are several ways to help make canine patients more comfortable, speed recovery, and prevent future infections. Tracheobronchitis is called kennel cough because of its association with boarding kennels, animal shelters, veterinary waiting rooms, grooming salons, and other areas where dogs congregate in close quarters. It can strike dogs of any age but is most common in puppies, whose immune systems are still developing, and adult dogs with conditions that impair immune function.   More...