Homemade Dog Food Ingredients: 3 Essential Foods for Dogs

Whole Dog Journal steers away from providing dog guardians with step-by-step recipes for dog food, raw or cooked. We can share expert dog companions’ personal protocols for feeding their dogs home-prepared, but quickly you will realize not only that the perfect dog food recipe does not exist, but that in order for your dog to receive all necessary nutrients, you really need many recipes that include many different whole food ingredients.   More...

Best Types of Crates for Dog Training

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Whole Dog Journal has written a lot in the past about the usefulness of having a comfortable crate your dog calls home. Crates are a convenient way to keep your dog out of harm's way, out of your way, and away from guests when necessary. A crate is regarded as the safest way to transport dogs in the car, and if you ever fly with your dog, you're going to need a crate for that too.   More...

Grabbing Your Dog's Collar: Why and How to Practice

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Let’s take a moment to talk about collar grabs. I see a worrisome number of dogs who duck away when their human reaches for their collar. This is not only annoying for the human, it is also dangerous. Imagine what happens in an emergency, when the owner needs to quickly corral the dog to keep her out of danger, and the dog ducks away from the reaching hand and runs off.   More...

Nose Work is Great Exercise for Dogs!

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When your dog has learned how to search, this makes a great rainy day indoor exercise activity. You can also routinely scatter her meals around the yard so she has to search through the grass to find them; put her on a long line if you don’t have a fence. You can also name her favorite toys and have her find them. You can even have family members and friends hide and have her find them.   More...

Safe Dog Food Bowls (and How to Keep Them That Way)

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The easiest type of bowl to keep clean – and, not incidently, also the safest bowl for your dog to eat and drink from – is stainless steel. This material will not leach potentially dangerous chemicals into your dog’s food and water, like some plastics, aluminum, poorly glazed pottery, or old ceramic dishes. Stainless steel and glass bowls are similarly inert, but stainless steel wins in my house, due to its durability on the floor and in the sink.   More...

Teach Your Dog to Choose Things

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Our dogs have very little opportunity for choice in their lives in today’s world. We tell them when to eat, when to play, when to potty, when and where to sleep. We expect them to walk politely on leash without exploring the rich and fascinating world around them, and want them to lie quietly on the floor for much of the day. Compare this to the lives dogs used to live, running around the farm, chasing squirrels at will, eating and rolling in deer poop, chewing on sticks, digging in the mud, swimming in the pond, and following the tractor.   More...

Whole Dog Journal's Canned Dog Food Selection Criteria

A whole, named animal protein in one of the first two positions on the ingredients list. “Whole” means no byproducts. “Named” means a specific animal species – chicken, beef, pork, lamb – as opposed to “meat” or “poultry.” Look for products with the highest possible inclusion of top-quality animal proteins; in other words, choose a product with the animal product listed first over a product that listed water (or broth) first and the animal product second.   More...

8 Steps to a Behaviorally Healthy Dog

You can start the process of socializing and training at any stage of a dog’s life! Making positive associations for your dog is faster and easier for youngsters than adults, but it’s always worth trying to teach new ways of thinking that will improve your dog's quality of life and overall happiness.   More...

Buying the Best Canned Dog Food: Behind WDJ's Approved Wet Dog Food List

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Finding a top-quality dog food is not impossible if you know what nutritional ingredients to look for. Whole Dog Journal reports on the best canned dog food available in pet stores - how to pick commercial dog food that meets your dogs' dietary requirements, and which ingredients indicate a low- or high-quality pet food. Here is everything the pet food industry doesn't want you to know! No can of commercial dog food is going to be perfect for every dog, but to ensure your dog receives a proper balance of nutrients, the one you feed should meet the Whole Dog criteria. Your goal in selecting a food is to find the one with the most animal-specific proteins, whole food ingredients, and the least artificial additives.   More...

The February 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online! Here is a brief summary of what you'll find...

Whole Dog Journal's Approved Dry Dog Foods List for 2011 is upon us. Along with the list of this year’s approved dry dog foods we’ll explain on what criteria you should use when selecting a food for your dog. Some of these criteria range from price, ingredients, a manufactures’ past history and the size of the manufacturer. All of the products that made the list have met our selection criteria – including our newest criterion, that the company discloses the name and location of its manufacturers.   More...

Home-Prepared Dog Food Diet Books

Over the past few months, I’ve read more than 30 books on homemade diets for dogs. Many offered recipes that were dangerously incomplete; a smaller number provided acceptable guidelines but were confusing, unduly restrictive, overly complicated, or had other issues that made me recommend them only with reservations. A few were good enough to recommend without reservation. This review is about the cream of the crop: three relatively new books (one is a new edition of an older book) whose authors have taken the time to analyze their recipes to ensure that they meet the latest nutritional guidelines established by the National Research Council (NRC).   More...

The March 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online! Here is a brief summary of what you'll find...

Over the past few months Nancy Kerns has read more than 30 books on homemade diets for dogs. Hence the article, A Review of the Best Books on Home-Prepared Dog Food Diets on the Market ; is about the cream of the crop: three relatively new books (one is a new edition of an older book) whose authors have taken the time to analyze their recipes to ensure that they meet the latest nutritional guidelines established by the National Research Council (NRC).   More...

The April 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online!

Subscribers Only — Maybe this has happened to you: You’re reading or watching TV or at your computer, and your dog is lying on the carpet near you. You’re absorbed in what you are doing, but all of a sudden, you realize that your dog is licking or chewing himself, or scratching his ear with a hind paw. “Hey!” you say to your dog. “Stop that!” Your dog stops, looks at you, and wags his tail. The most common sign of allergy in the dog is itching. In Canine Allergies: Most Common Causes, Best Tests, and Effective Treatments you will learn how to diagnose, treat, and manage the allergic dog so he can stop licking, chewing, and scratching himself to pieces.   More...

What's The Best Dry Dog Food for Your Dog?

How should you select the right dog food for your dog? Over the years, we’ve spoken to literally thousands of dog owners and industry experts – and they have at least a few hundred different approaches to the task. We’ll briefly discuss some of the most prevalent factors used by owners to support their dog food buying decisions – and then we’ll tell you how we recommend choosing your dogs’ food.   More...

The January 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online! Here is a brief summary of what you'll find...

Subscribers Only — Your dog grabs your stuff and runs away either because she knows you’re going to take it from her and she doesn’t want you to, or she’s inviting you to join in her a fun game of “Catch me if you can.” In either case, chasing after her is usually the least effective way to get your stuff back. Besides the obvious “management, to prevent her access to your stuff,” and “exercise (mental and physical) to keep her happily otherwise occupied,” here are five suggestions that will maximize your chances of getting your precious thing(s) back quickly, relatively unscathed.   More...