Symptoms and Treatment of Foxtail Invasions in Dogs

bloodyfoxtailB.jpg

While some ?rst aid may be possible in the event of a foxtail wound, in almost all cases you should get your dog to a veterinarian as soon as possible. Delaying treatment allows the foxtail to do further damage; avoiding foxtail treatment altogether could lead to your dog developing a chronic illness or could even lead to death.   More...

Can Dogs Eat Avocado?

Dogs can eat avocado flesh, if they like it, without problems. The reason some say not to give avocados to dogs is because avocados are known to contain a toxin called persin, which is quite dangerous to other animals like horses and birds but is in fact harmless to dogs in small amounts. Avocados hold the highest concentrations of persin in their leaves, thick skin, and pits; avocado flesh contains low levels of this chemical – a negligible amount for most humans, and for most dogs too. We don’t eat the leaves, skin, or pits of avocados, so don’t give these to your dog. A few thin slices of fresh avocado over your dog’s dinner, or as a nutrient-rich treat, however, will be fine for your dog, unless of course he has a food allergy to it.   More...

5 Essential Dog Training Supplies

You don't need to spend a lot of money on dog training supplies to be prepared to train your dog effectively. For most dogs, a well-fitted harness, comfortable flat-buckle collar, sturdy leash, and some tasty treats are all you will need to teach your dog to love training time! When dogs love their training, they learn behaviors quickly, and the best training never over-complicates things. Save your cash and time on fancy high-tech dog training gear and stick with Whole Dog Journal's 5 positive dog training gear essentials!   More...

Dog Collars or Harnesses: Which is Better?

You may see a lot more dogs on the street today wearing harnesses rather than having their leashes attached to collars. Are harnesses safer for dogs than collars? Should you abandon the your dog's traditional collar altogether? The fact is, there are many types of collars AND harnesses on the market, and some serve specific purposes. The front-clip harness, for example, is heralded as the best kind of restraint tool for a dog who pulls on the leash during walks. Head halters, on the other hand, should really only be used by professional dog handlers in specialty situations, like in show rings.   More...

Teach Your Dog to Choose Things

youchoose_backcoverDSC.jpg

Our dogs have very little opportunity for choice in their lives in today’s world. We tell them when to eat, when to play, when to potty, when and where to sleep. We expect them to walk politely on leash without exploring the rich and fascinating world around them, and want them to lie quietly on the floor for much of the day. Compare this to the lives dogs used to live, running around the farm, chasing squirrels at will, eating and rolling in deer poop, chewing on sticks, digging in the mud, swimming in the pond, and following the tractor.   More...

Whole Dog Journal's Canned Dog Food Selection Criteria

A whole, named animal protein in one of the first two positions on the ingredients list. “Whole” means no byproducts. “Named” means a specific animal species – chicken, beef, pork, lamb – as opposed to “meat” or “poultry.” Look for products with the highest possible inclusion of top-quality animal proteins; in other words, choose a product with the animal product listed first over a product that listed water (or broth) first and the animal product second.   More...

Grabbing Your Dog's Collar: Why and How to Practice

9treatDSC_0711a.jpg

Let’s take a moment to talk about collar grabs. I see a worrisome number of dogs who duck away when their human reaches for their collar. This is not only annoying for the human, it is also dangerous. Imagine what happens in an emergency, when the owner needs to quickly corral the dog to keep her out of danger, and the dog ducks away from the reaching hand and runs off.   More...

Best Types of Crates for Dog Training

dreamstime_m_101466439a.jpg

Whole Dog Journal has written a lot in the past about the usefulness of having a comfortable crate your dog calls home. Crates are a convenient way to keep your dog out of harm's way, out of your way, and away from guests when necessary. A crate is regarded as the safest way to transport dogs in the car, and if you ever fly with your dog, you're going to need a crate for that too.   More...

Top 20 Essential Oils for Dogs

Carrot Seed (Daucus carota). Skin care, first aid, healing, scarring, skin conditions. Super gentle. Cedarwood, Atlas (Cedrus atlantica). Improves circulation, helps deter fleas. Skin care. Chamomile, German (Matricaria recutita). Also called blue chamomile. Skin-soothing anti-inflammatory. Burns, allergic reactions, skin irritations. Chamomile, Roman (Anthemis nobilis). Intensely calming and antispasmodic. Wound care, teething pain. Clary sage (Salvia sclarea). Different from common garden sage. Gentle, sedating, calming   More...

8 Steps to a Behaviorally Healthy Dog

You can start the process of socializing and training at any stage of a dog’s life! Making positive associations for your dog is faster and easier for youngsters than adults, but it’s always worth trying to teach new ways of thinking that will improve your dog's quality of life and overall happiness.   More...

Home-Prepared Dog Food Diet Books

Over the past few months, I’ve read more than 30 books on homemade diets for dogs. Many offered recipes that were dangerously incomplete; a smaller number provided acceptable guidelines but were confusing, unduly restrictive, overly complicated, or had other issues that made me recommend them only with reservations. A few were good enough to recommend without reservation. This review is about the cream of the crop: three relatively new books (one is a new edition of an older book) whose authors have taken the time to analyze their recipes to ensure that they meet the latest nutritional guidelines established by the National Research Council (NRC).   More...

The February 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online! Here is a brief summary of what you'll find...

Whole Dog Journal's Approved Dry Dog Foods List for 2011 is upon us. Along with the list of this year’s approved dry dog foods we’ll explain on what criteria you should use when selecting a food for your dog. Some of these criteria range from price, ingredients, a manufactures’ past history and the size of the manufacturer. All of the products that made the list have met our selection criteria – including our newest criterion, that the company discloses the name and location of its manufacturers.   More...

The March 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online! Here is a brief summary of what you'll find...

Over the past few months Nancy Kerns has read more than 30 books on homemade diets for dogs. Hence the article, A Review of the Best Books on Home-Prepared Dog Food Diets on the Market ; is about the cream of the crop: three relatively new books (one is a new edition of an older book) whose authors have taken the time to analyze their recipes to ensure that they meet the latest nutritional guidelines established by the National Research Council (NRC).   More...

The April 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online!

Subscribers Only — Maybe this has happened to you: You’re reading or watching TV or at your computer, and your dog is lying on the carpet near you. You’re absorbed in what you are doing, but all of a sudden, you realize that your dog is licking or chewing himself, or scratching his ear with a hind paw. “Hey!” you say to your dog. “Stop that!” Your dog stops, looks at you, and wags his tail. The most common sign of allergy in the dog is itching. In Canine Allergies: Most Common Causes, Best Tests, and Effective Treatments you will learn how to diagnose, treat, and manage the allergic dog so he can stop licking, chewing, and scratching himself to pieces.   More...

The May 2011 issue of Whole Dog Journal is now available online!

Subscribers Only — It’s a very tempting concept – that a perfect food for every dog exists out there, somewhere. It must be tempting, because the pet food manufacturers keep increasing the number of products they formulate and market toward the owners of dogs of a progressively narrow description. Seriously – there are foods labeled for large breed seniors, and indoor toy puppies. In the article An Education in Specialty Dog Foods we ask the question whether or not your dog’s specialty food is really all that special? As always, you have to look past the marketing and disregard the illustrations on the label; it’s the ingredients and the guaranteed analysis of the food you need to examine.   More...