Kennel Cough in Dogs: Symptoms, Treatment, Prevention

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Anyone who’s heard it will recognize the dry, hacking, something’s-stuck-in-my-throat cough that won’t quit. It’s the signature symptom of canine infectious tracheobronchitis, also known as Bordetellosis, Bordetella, and most commonly as kennel cough. Whatever you call it, tracheobronchitis is one of the world’s most widespread canine diseases. Like the common cold in humans, tracheobronchitis is highly contagious, rarely fatal, and runs its course in a few days. Fortunately, there are several ways to help make canine patients more comfortable, speed recovery, and prevent future infections. Tracheobronchitis is called kennel cough because of its association with boarding kennels, animal shelters, veterinary waiting rooms, grooming salons, and other areas where dogs congregate in close quarters. It can strike dogs of any age but is most common in puppies, whose immune systems are still developing, and adult dogs with conditions that impair immune function.   More...

Whole Dog Journal: Who We Are

For 20 years, Whole Dog Journal has upheld its reputation as a leader in dog companionship and care information. We take our mission statement seriously, and we've gained a lot of respect for that over the years, bringing us more and more new readers every month! However, now we'd like to share with our readers both new and old three aspects of the dog guardianship world you will NOT find in Whole Dog Journal.   More...

9 Things To Do if Your Puppy Has Kennel Cough

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Kennel cough, or tracheobronchitis, is comparable to the common cold in humans. Nevertheless, it is frightening to many new dog guardians to discover that their puppy or newly rescued dog has contracted the disease. An unrelenting goose-like cough is the hallmark of kennel cough in dogs, but fortunately, most cases are treated successfully at home. To ensure your puppy recovers from kennel cough in a minimal amount of time and without complication, Whole Dog Journal has outlined the necessary steps you, the concerned guardian, need to take.   More...

The Puppy Socialization Exposure Checklist

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One of the things I’ve discovered in my puppy classes is that many people assume socialization is simply about getting your dog around lots of people to be petted and plenty of dogs to play with. This can be a piece of the socialization package, but remember that the goal of socialization is to get your pup accustomed to and comfortable with the world around him. Puppies need to be exposed in a pleasant way to the following things.   More...

Dog Pancreatitis Symptoms, Causes, and Treatment

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Because most dogs with pancreatitis are unwilling to eat, a liquid diet may be fed via a tube placed through the nose, esophagus, or stomach. Dogs may tolerate nasoesophageal feeding even when vomiting persists. There is evidence that pancreatic secretions are suppressed during an attack of pancreatitis, so food delivered in this manner stimulates the pancreas less than we used to believe, and helps to maintain the health of the gastrointestinal tract and decrease inflammation and side effects.   More...

Canine Parvovirus Vaccine, Symptoms, and Treatment

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How is parvo spread among dogs? Whole Dog Journal discusses a number of canine parvovirus prevention and treatment approaches taken by veterinarians and dog guardians today. Reactions to parvovirus vary widely. In a world where parvovirus is literally everywhere, parvo kills some dogs and leaves others unscathed. And in the debate about parvo vaccination, some people vaccinate their dogs early and often, while others refuse to vaccinate against parvo at all.   More...

Buying the Best Canned Dog Food: Behind WDJ's Approved Wet Dog Food List

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Finding a top-quality dog food is not impossible if you know what nutritional ingredients to look for. Whole Dog Journal reports on the best canned dog food available in pet stores - how to pick commercial dog food that meets your dogs' dietary requirements, and which ingredients indicate a low- or high-quality pet food. Here is everything the pet food industry doesn't want you to know! No can of commercial dog food is going to be perfect for every dog, but to ensure your dog receives a proper balance of nutrients, the one you feed should meet the Whole Dog criteria. Your goal in selecting a food is to find the one with the most animal-specific proteins, whole food ingredients, and the least artificial additives.   More...

8 Steps to a Behaviorally Healthy Dog

You can start the process of socializing and training at any stage of a dog’s life! Making positive associations for your dog is faster and easier for youngsters than adults, but it’s always worth trying to teach new ways of thinking that will improve your dog's quality of life and overall happiness.   More...

Top 20 Essential Oils for Dogs

Carrot Seed (Daucus carota). Skin care, first aid, healing, scarring, skin conditions. Super gentle. Cedarwood, Atlas (Cedrus atlantica). Improves circulation, helps deter fleas. Skin care. Chamomile, German (Matricaria recutita). Also called blue chamomile. Skin-soothing anti-inflammatory. Burns, allergic reactions, skin irritations. Chamomile, Roman (Anthemis nobilis). Intensely calming and antispasmodic. Wound care, teething pain. Clary sage (Salvia sclarea). Different from common garden sage. Gentle, sedating, calming   More...

5 Reasons to Feed Your Dog Raw Honey

Most dogs love the sweet taste of honey. If you feed raw honey, your dog will benefit from the many health properties it contains as well! Raw honey fights allergies and heals wounds, soothes coughs, and eases canine stomachs.   More...

Canine Body Language Danger Signs

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Dogs almost always give clear signals – though the signs may be subtle – before they bite. A “bite without warning” is truly a rare occurrence. Most of the time the human just wasn’t listening, or didn’t have any education about what the dog was expressing. I have worked with dogs professionally for more than 40 years and, knock wood, experienced only a handful of bites, none of them serious.   More...

Teach Your Dog to Choose Things

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Our dogs have very little opportunity for choice in their lives in today’s world. We tell them when to eat, when to play, when to potty, when and where to sleep. We expect them to walk politely on leash without exploring the rich and fascinating world around them, and want them to lie quietly on the floor for much of the day. Compare this to the lives dogs used to live, running around the farm, chasing squirrels at will, eating and rolling in deer poop, chewing on sticks, digging in the mud, swimming in the pond, and following the tractor.   More...

Whole Dog Journal's Canned Dog Food Selection Criteria

A whole, named animal protein in one of the first two positions on the ingredients list. “Whole” means no byproducts. “Named” means a specific animal species – chicken, beef, pork, lamb – as opposed to “meat” or “poultry.” Look for products with the highest possible inclusion of top-quality animal proteins; in other words, choose a product with the animal product listed first over a product that listed water (or broth) first and the animal product second.   More...

Grabbing Your Dog's Collar: Why and How to Practice

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Let’s take a moment to talk about collar grabs. I see a worrisome number of dogs who duck away when their human reaches for their collar. This is not only annoying for the human, it is also dangerous. Imagine what happens in an emergency, when the owner needs to quickly corral the dog to keep her out of danger, and the dog ducks away from the reaching hand and runs off.   More...

Best for Dogs: Collars or Harnesses?

You may see a lot more dogs on the street today wearing harnesses rather than having their leashes attached to collars. Are harnesses safer for dogs than collars? Should you abandon the your dog's traditional collar altogether? The fact is, there are many types of collars AND harnesses on the market, and some serve specific purposes. The front-clip harness, for example, is heralded as the best kind of restraint tool for a dog who pulls on the leash during walks. Head halters, on the other hand, should really only be used by professional dog handlers in specialty situations, like in show rings.   More...