Whole Dog Journal Tips November 24, 2014

(The Culture Clash Tip #5) Training Regressions

People are terribly mystified by any change in their dog's behavior and go on a lot with the "why? WHY" as though there should never be any variability whatsoever in this living organism's behavior. Training regressions are a frequent occurrence and no big deal. It is so important to remember that behavior is always in flux, constantly subjected to whatever contingencies there are in the environment as well as being influenced by unknown internal events. In the case of behavior problems, there are three main reasons for behavior that had seemed to be "fixed" to break down again:

  1. Undertraining: the behavior was never that strong in the first place

  2. Contingency change: the behavior extinguished or another one was trained by the owner or environment

  3. Failure to generalize: the behavior falls apart in the a new location or context

A "contingency change" example: Inadvertent New Rules

A contingency change might look like the following. The dog has learned that it's safe and often reinforcing to urinate in the yard and dangerous in most places he has tried in the house and so a fairly solid yard habit is in place. The owner has become upset about the yellowing of grass from dog urine and has decided to limit the dog to eliminating in one corner of the yard. The owner takes the dog on leash at elimination times for a couple of weeks, always going to one corner and praising the dog for urinating. The first couple of times the dog goes out off leash, she urinates in the wrong area. The owner punishes the dog. On the third day, the dog will now urinate in the yard. The owners sees this and takes the dog for a walk. The dog has a very full bladder and finally urinates and is praised by the owner. The owner likes the idea of the dog urinating on the walk rather than in the yard and starts taking the dog around the block to eliminate, which is successful and keeps the yard urine-free.

A few months later, the owner is in a rush to prepare for guests arriving so lets the dog into the yard to pee while finishing the cooking. The dog does not urinate in the yard and comes back in full. When the guests arrive, the owner puts the dog on leash to calm one of the visitors who is afraid of dogs. The dog urinates on the Persian rug. The owner thinks the dog sensed that one of the guests didn't like her and urinated to demonstrate her resentment. In fact, the dog has learned to urinate when on leash only, based on the new contingencies inadvertently set up by the owner. Dogs aren't into big agendas. They just need to know where and when it's safe to pee.

From Jean Donaldson's thought-provoking book, The Culture Clash, dog owners will learn and get a better understanding of the relationship between dogs and humans. Purchase The Culture Clash from Whole Dog Journal today