Features October 2012 Issue

Older Dogs and Surgery

The mass on Ling Ling’s shoulder before surgery.

Older Dogs and Surgery

Some are reluctant to perform surgery on old dogs because of anesthesia risks or complications, but these risks are minimal in the case of most lipomas. Modern anesthesia protocols are far safer than they used to be, and complications are generally minor, usually limited to superficial infection or delayed healing. There is no reason not to remove lipomas from older dogs when they interfere with their quality of life.

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