October 2016

Dog Shelter Vaccination Protocols May Vary

Puppies who have the misfortune to be born in or surrendered to a shelter after birth may not receive any antibodies from their mothers; if their mothers were not vaccinated or otherwise exposed to the core diseases, they wouldn’t have antibodies to pass along. Also, puppies may not have had sufficient access to colostrum. In addition, shelters are often teeming with infectious disease agents.   More...

Identifying Arthritis in Dogs

Subscribers Only — There are a number of types of arthritis that affect dogs: osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, septic or infective arthritis, spinal stenosis, spondylitis and spondylosis. Conventional medicine considers arthritis in dogs and humans a chronic disease that progresses and has no cure but which can be managed with symptom-suppressing drugs and other therapies. Holistic veterinarians manage arthritis in dogs with diet, nutritional supplements, medicinal herbs, and a variety of noninvasive treatments, many of which dog lovers can provide at home.   More...

Separation Anxiety in Dogs: Symptoms and How to Modify the Behavior

Subscribers Only — Separation anxiety is a condition in which the dog becomes upset when separated from one or more humans with whom he has hyper-bonded. A dog with true separation anxiety experiences a severe panic attack when he is left alone. Escape attempts by a dog with separation anxiety can be extreme and may result in self-injury. Household destruction often occurs, especially around exit points like windows and doors. Some dogs have even jumped through windows in their desperate attempts to find their humans. Separation-related behaviors vary in intensity from one dog to the next. Milder forms of the behavior are more appropriately called “separation distress,” while the full-blown panic attack truly deserves the label “separation anxiety.   More...

Puppy Vaccines: Why Your Dog Needs So Many Shots

Puppy vaccine schedules can be daunting to new dog owners. Why do puppies need so many shots? Are all those puppy vaccinations really necessary? Most veterinarians recommend that puppies are vaccinated for distemper, parvovirus, and adenovirus (hepatitis) a number of times, starting when they are about four to six weeks old, and again every three or four weeks, with their last “puppy vaccination” given after they are about 16 to 20 weeks old.   More...

WDJ’s 2016 Approved “Gold Star” Canned Dog Foods

Subscribers Only — The following pet food companies not only offer wet dog foods that meet our ingredient selection criteria, but also provided Whole Dog Journal with independent, third-party laboratory nutritional analyses of their dog foods – analyses confirming that their canned dog foods are not just “formulated to meet,” but do actually meet the AAFCO Canine Nutrient Profiles. In our opinion, these companies constitute an elite group – a “gold star” class of dog food makers who are willing and readily able to prove that their products are “complete and balanced” – something we think that all dog food companies should be required to provide.   More...

2016 Canned Dog Food Review

Subscribers Only — Many owners who feed canned dog food make that selection for a specific reason, for a limited period of time – for example, to motivate an elderly dog or a dog suffering from a health condition that causes weight loss and a poor appetite to eat more. The one exception might be people with very tiny dogs, who may have trouble chewing or swallowing kibble, and whose caloric needs are so minimal, that it might take two days or more to consume a single can. It’s too bad that it’s so costly, because, fed in appropriate amounts, canned food is a very healthy choice for dogs. Its moisture content is far closer to that of so-called evolutionary diets for dogs, the sort of food dogs ate before they came to rely on us to feed them.   More...

Ask For More

Pet food companies don’t have to prove that their products contain the minimum amounts of all the nutrients that are considered essential for dogs before labeling and selling their foods as “complete and balanced” diets. In fact, in all likelihood, some of the products on the market today – perhaps your dog’s food? – may not meet some of the legal requirements of a “complete and balanced” food, even though their labels say they do. To help you understand how this is possible, I have to dive into a lot of facts, and explain some things about the pet food industry and how the whole notion of “complete and balanced diets” is legally defined and regulated.   More...