Whole Dog Journal's Blog October 18, 2011

When Friends Breed Their Dogs

Posted by Nancy Kerns at 09:16AM - Comments: (37)

I’m going to have to ask for forgiveness ahead of time: This post may well offend some of my friends, neighbors, and readers. I’m sorry – and conflicted.

I’ve been asked a number of times for my opinion about breeding dogs. Do I know a good male Jack Russell to mate with their female; would I suggest buying a puppy from that breeder who advertises puppies on the billboard by the highway; how long should they wait until they breed their German Shepherd Dog?

In each case, I probably initially appeared to be having a heart attack, what with the sudden paleness, dry mouth, sweat on my brow, and an enlarged artery throbbing at my throat. In every case in which my opinion has been solicited, my answer was that a truly responsible dog owner would find the puppy or dog of his or her dreams at a shelter or rescue group.

But oh!, my friends have unwittingly replied, we want to keep this bloodline alive, and all the puppies are spoken for already. We really want a dog who is related to all these other dogs we admire in the field. And we are looking forward to making some money on these puppies!

In none of these cases have I thought the person I was talking to had a valid reason to breed their dog.

Don’t get me wrong: I love, admire, and respect well-bred, purebred dogs – dogs whose parents were healthy, sane, sound, well-researched and thoughtfully selected (and scrupulously prepared for producing a healthy litter). 

Unfortunately, these are in the minority, and more amateurs getting into breeding aren’t going to increase their numbers. There are many, many purebred dogs – “AKC registered! With papers!” – that have been produced by genetically, physically, and/or mentally flawed parents at the hands of ill-informed owners. Other people buy or adopt these “registered” pups when they are darling, and their defects are not yet apparent . . . and many, many of them wind up euthanized in shelters and vet clinics all over the country.

I don’t know a single person who has spent a significant amount of time in an animal shelter who condones anything but the most stringent, selective, limited breeding of purebred dogs. There is something about seeing piles of dead pets, day after day, that pretty much turns off the desire to deliberately see more pets get produced.

What about people who work in rescue, or the very rare shelter that doesn’t kill (or transfer away) ANY dogs or cats? (Remember, most “no-kill” facilities do kill animals; they just label these ones “unadoptable” or they transfer the “unadoptable” ones to facilities that do the killing.) Folks I know in rescue work or “no-kill” shelters are also against breeding – not because they’ve seen so many dead animals, but because they are so completely overwhelmed with the oversupply of difficult-to-adopt living animals.

Look, I tell my friends and neighbors: At my local shelters, I can find a dog of any breed, size, age, color, and temperament that you want. It might take a little time to find that young make merle long-haired Dachshund or adult apricot toy female Poodle – but it can be done without breeding. I yearn for the day that this is different, when the shelters are well below capacity and every dog can find a home within days of losing another one.

In the meantime, unless you are one of those special few, who can recite bloodlines and honestly assess their merits, who produces just a few dogs each year and is  prepared to take each and every one of them back, for the life of the dogs – please don’t ask me about breeding.

Comments (37)

"People will obtain a pet, either legally, or thru black market channels. "

although I agree with your post and find it refreshing.. I do not understand this comment..other than stealing or buying a stolen dog.. what is a "black market" for dogs?

Posted by: doug williams | December 6, 2011 12:09 AM    Report this comment

"9,060 dog intakes (3,439 euthanized) - 38% killed - 17,896 cat intakes (7,280 euthanized) - 41% killed"

well that means that 62% of the dogs WERE taken out fo the shleter.. that is much better than in the past.. and you must factor in dogs that are deemed "adoptable" ( sadly mostly "pit bulls" that the public has been made to be afraid of) and dogs that are old, sick , owner request euthanasia. and dogs that are DOA.. so really you are doing a pretty good job..and it will only get better.. sadly cats are not the same story .. but I would guess that most of the cats are feral.. with no owners at all.

Posted by: doug williams | December 6, 2011 12:01 AM    Report this comment

"It might take a little time to find that young make merle long-haired Dachshund or adult apricot toy female Poodle - but it can be done without breeding." really how can dogs be produced without breeding.. out of thin air perhaps.. If you want the Apricot Poodle get one from a BREEDER.. also I keep seeing that only "professionals" should be "allowed" to bred dogs. really?/ most "professionals" are usda licensed breeders.. and I know what you call them. A hobby breeder is the very best place to get a dog.. the VERY BEST PLACE and yet here and on other animal site I see noting but comtept for anyone who breeds a litter of puppies.. .. oh and by the way AKC is just a registry.. they do not set breed standards ..the breed parent clubs do that.. you don;t want 'amateur breeding" and you certainly don;t want commercial breeding.. so what is that you do want? [perhaps NO breeding might suit most of you) and you only want people to have "shelter dogs". If you want shelters to be less empty than they are ( and many are very empty.. and import dogs from as far away as Romania)then ENCOURAGE hobby breeders.. stop painting every breed as some sort of "horror story' and please stop saying each breeder should be made to work at a shelter.. do you tell your pregnant daughter she should work at an orphanage before she has a baby.. most people know what happens at KILL shelters..that is why we support GOOD breeders..an no kill

Posted by: doug williams | December 5, 2011 11:55 PM    Report this comment

All my dogs have been shelter rescues except for one - a purebred, papers included Boston Terrier, who's original parent had died. Needless to say, all my dogs had medical problems later in their lives, but the Boston Terrier had them earlier and more profound - eye problems with major surgeries. There are way too many dogs in shelters - many "pure breeds" that need homes: breeding is rarely a money making project, so it should be left to the real professionals. Lastly, Best Friends out in Utah does not destroy animals, even the anti-social misfits, and physically challenged have homes for life.

Posted by: keller1312 | October 26, 2011 10:05 AM    Report this comment

Great blog to get a hearty debate going :) I worked as a vet tech for 4 years, volunteer at the humane society (HVHS), foster dogs/cats in need when able, and have owned my own dog walking and pet sitting biz for 13 years. I have 4 cats and 3 dogs all of whom are spayed/neutered (though I seriously considered breeding a couple very special ones before finally giving in to the guilt of pet overpopulation and removing their ability to have babies without their consent). YET I still have no problem with RESPONSIBLE breeding of good genetic lines. Does that mean AKC papers? No, to me it doesn't. AKC is like a human beauty pageant that *sometimes* (depending on the breed group) values beauty over health. That is when you get G. Shepherds with messed up low slung hips, Pugs that can't give birth on their own and Bassetts and Shar Pei's that have horrible skin issues and eye problems because they are wayyy too wrinkled. Yes, there is too much of a *good looking thing* when it makes them unhealthy. There needs to be a *responsible* breeder at the helm that is in it for the *betterment of the breed* NOT money and does not have too many animals that they cannot financially care for them all properly. I personally have no problem with breeders when they have the best interests of the animals at heart (balanced mind AND body) and are not in it for greed. Stay away from pet store/puppy mill puppies please, that is greed at the extreme. That is my thoughts on the subject.

Posted by: Fur Purr | October 21, 2011 7:04 AM    Report this comment

We created a web site to answer some of these people and to educate consumers on where to get a puppy and where NOT to get a puppy. www.pupquest.org Now whenever anyone asks if they should breed their dog or say they want to get a puppy or dog, we send them to www.pupquest.org and it prevents the conversations that raise your blood pressure!!

Posted by: PupQuest | October 20, 2011 10:12 PM    Report this comment

I think I may have to print this out and just hand it to people who say similar things to me. It would save my blood pressure. ;)

Posted by: SarahDogMom | October 20, 2011 8:19 PM    Report this comment

Just a note to say that the AKC is DEFINITELY NOT the "ideal standard" for many breeds. Just having papers does not a quality dog make, and even having an AKC championship does not guarantee physical or mental soundness. There are many registries for many different breeds of dogs- some that are simply for form or "pretty," some are for function, and some are for both. I have a very well-bred GSD that is AKC registered, but would never win in an AKC conformation. However, she comes from a long line of German SV registered, working and conformation tested dogs. I would NEVER trust a common "private" (=BYB) breeder to produce a physically and mentally sound purebred dog.

Posted by: Erika F | October 20, 2011 3:45 PM    Report this comment

If breeders were responsible for their puppies from birth until death there would be no shelters. A good breeder will always take back a dog that doesn't work out for what ever reason. The breeder will then rehome the dog. Not every one is cut out to breed dogs.

Posted by: Mike | October 20, 2011 3:44 PM    Report this comment

Do not apologize or ask forgiveness for this article -- you are right on the money. I am, and will always be, a proud and vocal proponent of the "Don't breed or buy while shelter dogs die" philosophy. Spaying, neutering, and very limited breeding (honestly, I'd prefer breeding laws/regulated breeding) is the only way to resolve the ridiculous and heartbreaking pet overpopulation problem in this country.

Posted by: iloverufus | October 20, 2011 3:30 PM    Report this comment

I have to agree. I volunteer at the Animal Care and Control Team (ACCT), 111 W. Hunting Park Avenue, Philadelphia. This is the ONLY city intake of animals in Philadelphia. The numbers are staggering. The final numbers for 2010:

- 9,060 dog intakes (3,439 euthanized) - 38% killed - 17,896 cat intakes (7,280 euthanized) - 41% killed

The MAJORITY of these animals are adoptable-quality! Many think that shelters only kill the sick and old. NOT TRUE!! These animals are mostly euthanized due to lack of space. There is no other choice. ACCT does a great job with trying to save animals through rescue groups and adoptions but with 25 dogs coming in each day and only 3-8 going out alive, you do the math.

I don't give a crap if you are a breeder. If you love dogs, go volunteer at an animal shelter. This will give you the full reality of the whole situation. It is beyond words. I am sick of seeing great animals die.

Posted by: James C | October 20, 2011 2:52 PM    Report this comment

As a breeder, I agree with your post. This year I co bred two litters of dogs, prior to that, I hadn't had a litter in over 6 years. The parents of both of these litters are bench champions, the parents of one litter are dual champions (field and bench). All have excellent temperaments and come from healthy, long lived lines. The puppies will go out on limited registrations and I take my puppies back for life. While I do show dogs, most recently dogs belonging to other people, I am far more involved in rescue. Several of the dogs in my home are rescue/shelter dogs. I am aware of all the unwanted dogs and cats that are euthanized every year, but I don't necessarily believe that this means responsible, careful, knowledgeable breeders shouldn't be breeding. It is not reputable breeders I want to stop breeding, it is the irresponsible breeders who don't take responsibility for what they produce and don't care in where those puppies end up. And, the people mass breeding for profit. Still, I struggle with it, which is one of the reasons why I am personally not breeding.

Posted by: Braveheartdogs | October 19, 2011 9:30 PM    Report this comment

I recommend the book "Dog Sense" by John Bradshaw. He intelligently writes about (among other important canine issues) the need for understanding genetics in dog breeding. His compassionate view as well as his scientific understanding may be extremely helpful in saving the lives of shelter dogs and dogs to be.

Posted by: Becky and Buddy | October 18, 2011 7:42 PM    Report this comment

I'm going to express a contrary view. I own three dogs--one crossbred German Shepherd/cattle dog (shelter), 1 purebred GSD (private breeder) and 1 backyard bred GSD. All good dogs, but of the three the outstanding one is the backyard bred GSD. He has no papers, but is of the old time sturdy conformation that all GSD's had before about 1970; and of the three, he is the most solid working dog. It is a recipe for disaster for any breed to be only bred to AKC criteria. We now have AKC herding dogs that can't herd, AKC German Shepherd dogs that are bred to be crippled with overangulated back legs and are useless for any purpose, AKC hunting dogs that can't hunt, and most tragically, AKC certified breeds that cannot reproduce except by C-section. We shouldn't forget that, a century ago, ALL dogs were backyard or ranch bred, and they were, on the whole, far healthier than most of the purebreds today. Cross bred dogs are often healthier, and it is a common practice on ranches to breed crossbreds for their working dogs. With all this in mind, I am not opposed to private people breeding their dogs.

Posted by: herbalist | October 18, 2011 4:39 PM    Report this comment

This is not an easily, or at all, resolvable issue. Having been Director of Animal Control for nearly 30 years, I have come to realize that it is not an over population issue, it is an owner retention issue. People will obtain a pet, either legally, or thru black market channels. Getting them to keep that pet is the answer to the problem.

Stop the Killing. Train your pet. Keep Your pet.

Posted by: KinNC | October 18, 2011 4:07 PM    Report this comment

I couldn't be happier about your post Nancy. I offer to find anyone I know looking for a dog, the perfect match through Petfinder, Rescues, or from the shelter I volunteer at. Slowly but surely the message is getting out..."don't shop, adopt"!!!!

Posted by: KELLI B | October 18, 2011 4:00 PM    Report this comment

I have the utmost respect for those people who are truly responsible breeders. They love and respect their breed and do everything in their power to make sure that they only breed the best of the best. They aren't in it for the money. You will usually find these people in show rings and many times, they insist that most of the offspring be spayed & neutered. It's those others that inflict a bad rep for them. Yes, there should be laws & guidelines for responsible breeding and fines for those that don't abide by them!! Those "law-breaking breeders" need to spend a day volunteering in a high kill shelter and maybe they'll figure out first hand what an epidemic they are contributing to.

Posted by: reganodietz | October 18, 2011 3:33 PM    Report this comment

First line goof, here's what I meant to write:

Lest anyone reading my comments think I'm _against_ adopting from a shelter ...

Posted by: Darcy J | October 18, 2011 3:27 PM    Report this comment

Lest anyone reading my comments think I'm adopting from a shelter - my current dog is a rescue. He's a poor example of his breed, was sold without any screening, and when his first mom couldn't handle him the breeder told her she was on her own. In desperation, she put him in rescue. His only issue when he came to me was that he was a heathen - no impulse control at all and barely housebroken.

If the right dog for you happens to be in a shelter, that's the dog you should get. Not because he's in a shelter, but because he's the right dog for you.

You can find plenty of dogs in shelters and rescues that are healthy and mentally and emotionally sound. Or, if you're up for a challenge, you can take in a dog that has health and/or behavioral issues and needs extra attention.

Posted by: Darcy J | October 18, 2011 3:25 PM    Report this comment

I volunteer at a shelter, I transport dogs, I am involved with Ohio "Ban Dog Auctions" group. The AKC doesn't care about the problems with puppy mills, they have representatives at the dog auctions to register dogs purchased. You want to see dogs tortured and abused, go to a puppy mill. You want to see dogs from puppy mills, go to a pet store that sells dogs, most of them end up at shelters. The AKC is not part of the solution, they are part of the problem. Educate people to keep them from buying puppy mill dogs and close the puppy mills. Want to feed your dog cheap food, find out which dog food processors buy dead dogs from the shelters and process them for the dog food. Spay and neuter is the right thing to do until the overpopulation is stopped.

Posted by: Harold H | October 18, 2011 3:10 PM    Report this comment

Dana S - you were given good advice, just not all of it. If you want a puppy with a known history and likely traits, go to a GOOD breeder, they can give you a very good idea of the temperament and traits of the dogs they produce, their suitability for a given situation, _and_ will be there to back you up throughout your dog's life. You said it yourself - the breeder you found was not a responsible/good breeder.

I'm still on the fence for my next dog - it will be either a puppy from a breeder that is as careful and disciplined as the one I got my heart dog from; or it will be an adult dog from known lines that has "failed" in some fashion (such as a hunting dog that won't hunt). It will be a purebred only because I've fallen in love with a particular breed (Weimaraner) and want to stay with that breed.

Posted by: Darcy J | October 18, 2011 3:09 PM    Report this comment

My heart dog met all the criteria to be used for breeding - conformationally sound (AKC, CKC and international champion), mentally stable, willing, excellent temperament, good health. I received multiple requests to breed him, but never with a female that was suitable, so he was never bred (lots of other equally good male dogs out there who were being shown more and had more letters after their names - they got all the suitable breeding opportnities). I never regretted saying "no" to those offers.

Posted by: Darcy J | October 18, 2011 2:43 PM    Report this comment

Please don't start with the hostage-logic that every puppy/kitten from a breeder steals a home from a shelter animal. Those shelter animals are there because of the people who dumped them there - lay the blame at their feet, not the feet of responsible breeders and owners. Part of being a responsible owner is finding the right dog/cat for you - that's the best way to assure that _your_ dog doesn't end up needing a new home.

My heart dog came from a breeder that evaluated the dam carefully before even considering breeding her (conformation, temperment, ability, etc..), then searched for a stud that would complement her traits. There was a wait list for the puppies long enough that even after folks had dropped out, there were three carefully screened families left who did not get a pup from the litter (a litter of eight pups). Three of the dogs were eventually returned, and the breeder found new homes for all of them. The first returnee came back at the age of six years, the last was eight when he was returned. One that came back came clear across the country to return to the breeder. The breeder knows to this day (over 13 years later) where every dog (and their descendants, all three of them) from that litter is.

Posted by: Darcy J | October 18, 2011 2:40 PM    Report this comment

I also agree. Six years ago when I decided I wanted a dog, without knowing much about dogs, I did a LOT of breed research - but unfortunately, not much breeder research. I ended up with two border collies that have serious dog-dog agression issues and I basically "learned by fire" about dogs. My breeder is a traditional "jerk and pop" trainer and I was taught various punishment based training methods that utlimately made my dogs much worse. Fortunately, I was eventually guided towards positive based training methods and spent 2 years researching dog behavior and working with various positive trainers. Although, I haven't been able to full resolve their dog-dog issues, I continue to manage them and provide the best life possible which has included competing in Rally and Canine Musical Freestyle.

Interestingly, when I was initially looking for a dog, I wanted to rescue but most "dog people" told me that rescuing or adopting was not a good choice as "those dogs" come with issues. I should start fresh with a puppy so I know what I am getting. That is probably some of the worst advice I was ever given, particularly as a dog owner with no experience. I have since volunteered with a rescue group, and I am now a huge proponent of adopting or rescuing a dog. You get much more support when rescuing or adopting - we would have been much better off with that support. And I believe you do get some knowledge about the dog's existing behavior and health issues so you do know what you are dealing with in most (not all) cases. Also, there are so many existing dogs out there looking for a home, why support bringing more of them into the world?

I never expected to have dogs with dog-dog issues - but now they hold a special place in my heart and I would love to rescue all of them and own a huge property where I could save those dogs that are "unadoptable" and provide them with the best life possible! I now do my best to educate people about dogs, dog behavior, rescues and shelters, and I too hope that someday, all dogs will have loving forever homes. So please "dog people" encourage adopting from shelters and rescues!

Posted by: DANA S | October 18, 2011 1:38 PM    Report this comment

For breeders who call themselves responsible, I really have to wonder what that means. Even if you are doing all the health checks, temperament checks, have a spay / neuter clause in your contract, screening applicants, and accepting the dog back if things don't work out essentially every time you sell a puppy a shelter animal looses out and it costs that animal its life. Perhaps the "responsible" thing to do right now is to stop breeding and start educating. Perhaps the next time someone calls you asking when your next litter is due you can say, "I'm not breeding right now, but I'd be happy to help you find an excellent pet at the local shelter." I do think there should be very strict guidelines for breeding, but honestly with the over population of pets right now, I think the term "responsible breeder" is an oxymoron.

Posted by: Kristen H | October 18, 2011 1:16 PM    Report this comment

Well said. I couldn't agree more, and I am heartbroken by all of the breeders who don't perform due diligence before breeding their dogs. Those who do all the health checks, temperament assessments, training and breed-specific (hunting, herding, etc.) work know that there isn't a profit in breeding. Instead, they do it for the love of the breed and their desire to improve it.

Thanks, Nancy, for speaking up and going on the record here. I'd love to introduce you to our Dudley--whom we acquired second hand at 14 weeks--and who has battled orthopedic challenges and surgery on all four limbs between the ages of 2 1/2 and 3. It is cruel that a few x-rays of his parents could have prevented passing this along (pulling one or both from the breeding program), and that his breeder still won't conduct health checks after she has been notified. And, what is our recourse? There isn't one. AKC is happy to keep taking her money for registrations, rather than caring what she's producing.

Posted by: Patti H | October 18, 2011 12:55 PM    Report this comment

Just wanted to make myself clear, I definitely am not BLAMING responsible breeders, I love the responsible breeders I know and I admire tremendously the lengths they go to trying to breed healthy, happy dogs and place them in excellent homes. I just would love a world where the responsible breeders are the ONLY breeders. It seems the the people giving purebred dogs a bad name -- and adding to the misery of the world by producing unhealthy dogs adopted by careless or just ill-equipped people -- are NOT the responsible breeders, they are the breeders who only want to make money. I think there should be rules in effect to discourage them. But we seem to live in a world where nobody thinks any rules should apply to "me", just other people. As long as I'm wishing for the impossible, I would love a world where we all worked together to make the rules sensible and effective. I know there are people trying to do that, and I wish them well.

Posted by: Layne E | October 18, 2011 11:38 AM    Report this comment

Here is my wish for all animals in our world!! Close down all puppy mills. Put a ban on all breeding of mix breeds, purebreds, etc., until all dogs in shelters have been adopted, and homeless dogs on the streets have found homes. Same laws should apply for cats. Our feline friends are not at all exempt from the results of over population and breeding! Our world is totally out of control, while the pet business is blood money, of which our animals pay the ultimate price. I speak for all the animals who cannot!! It would be aoi long long time before any breed became extinct, and in a short time, far less starving animals roaming the streets, and euthanasia would become only a necessity for our older companion pets, due to reaching a ripe old age, at their forever home......

Posted by: tld | October 18, 2011 11:32 AM    Report this comment

Here is my wish for all animals in our world!! Close down all puppy mills. Put a ban on all breeding of mix breeds, purebreds, etc., until all dogs in shelters have been adopted, and homeless dogs on the streets have found homes. Same laws should apply for cats. Our feline friends are not at all exempt from the results of over population and breeding! Our world is totally out of control, while the pet business is blood money, of which our animals pay the ultimate price. I speak for all the animals who cannot!! It would be a long long time before any breed became extinct, and in a short time, far less starving animals roaming the streets, and euthanasia would become only a necessity for our older companion pets, due to reaching a ripe old age, at their forever home......

Posted by: tld | October 18, 2011 11:29 AM    Report this comment

Here is my wish for all animals in our world!! Close down all puppy mills. Put a ban on all breeding of mix breeds, purebreds, etc., until all dogs in shelters have been adopted, and homeless dogs on the streets have found homes. Same laws should apply for cats. Our feline friends are not at all exempt from the results of over population and breeding! Our world is totally out of control, while the pet business is blood money, of which our animals pay the ultimate price. I speak for all the animals who cannot!! It would be a long long time before any breed became extinct, and in a short time, far less starving animals roaming the streets, and euthanasia would become only a necessity for our older companion pets, due to reaching a ripe old age, at their forever home......

Posted by: tld | October 18, 2011 11:28 AM    Report this comment

I also feel much the same way about breeding. I show in confirmation and have breed two Dachshund litters since I started in Dachshunds in 1993. I would like to address the comments about the Humane Society. Please check for yourself how much money really goes to the shelters and helps the animals. The anti breeding laws will do more harm to the honest caring breeders and help the puppy mills. I can't tell you how many people ask me if I know of anyone that will give their dog/puppy a good home because of what ever reason that they need to place it. I always ask did you contact the breeder? The answers vary from she moved away or I can't remember who it was , I don't have her number. These are the "purebreeds" that end up at the shelters. Many purchased them at a really good discounted price and now find that the dog is too much for their life style. I say that everyone should take responsibility , don't just blame the responsible breeders , you as a puppy buyer should take responsibility and run from someone who is only interested in your money!!!!

Posted by: SHARLEEN BERLOTTA | October 18, 2011 11:22 AM    Report this comment

I totally agree with Nancy Kearns and the people who have commented against any but the most responsible breeders breeding dogs. It is both a science and an art, and as Robert D said, they test their dogs for everything and still cross their fingers and hope for the best. I have three pure bred standard Poodles, (two red, one cream) who are now further along in years, Hamish our oldest is 10 1/2, Kippers and Haggis are litter mates at 8 1/2 years old. So far, the worst illness that any of them has had is ear infections. I know we have been lucky, but I put it down also to good breeding, sensible nutrition and lots of love. Elaine Grae

Posted by: Elaine G | October 18, 2011 11:17 AM    Report this comment

Layne wrote: "...They seem to despise organizations like the Humane Society, and to campaign actively even against anti-puppy mill legislation, even though they are often the very people who move heaven and earth to rescue dogs from these places and find them homes. I don't really understand this ..."

I was on a breed list and noticed exactly the same thing. I eventually got off the list because I couldn't stand the endless ranting. I just don't get it.

Meanwhile, my neighbor, a smart woman and enthusiastic dog lover is mindlessly breeding Shih Tzus. She'd hoped to make money doing it but now often just gives the puppies away. It's horrifying. Yes, I've talked with her and so has our vet (our dog and hers share the same vet) but she is unmoved. Something else I just don't get.

Posted by: CAROLYN M | October 18, 2011 10:53 AM    Report this comment

I wholeheartedly agree. As an owner of a very well bred and wonderful pure bred dog, and as someone who has been on many email lists and forums over the years focused on my previous dog's breed and now on my current dog's, it always seems to me that the responsible, devoted, experienced breeders -- the kind you would want to find for your own puppy, and often the kind of people you very much like and respect -- are the very ones ferociously opposed to any kind of legislation or regulation about dog breeding. They seem to despise organizations like the Humane Society, and to campaign actively even against anti-puppy mill legislation, even though they are often the very people who move heaven and earth to rescue dogs from these places and find them homes. I don't really understand this, you would think the responsible breeders would have everything to gain from sensible regulations discouraging amateur, careless breeding, and more importantly, discouraging those hideous, heartless people who raise puppies for profit under atrocious conditions. Anyway, keep up the good work, Whole Dog Journal is a treasure.

Posted by: Layne E | October 18, 2011 10:44 AM    Report this comment

I feel much the same way, we breed Std Poodles and I don't think a week goes by that we don't get a call from some nut that wants to "breed" thieir their dog. Like I'm going to let someone breed their untested dog to our 4-generations of tested dogs, you must be kidding.....We also get "breeders" wanting to mix breeds and wonder if we would have a stud dog. Mixing 2 different breeds, some tested some untested, each with their own bag of genetic problems creating a whole new set of genetic problems. What are people thinking....we test our dogs for everything and still cross our fingers and hope for the best.

Posted by: Robert D | October 18, 2011 10:39 AM    Report this comment

I wholeheartedly agree! More people need to be educated on the over population of pets. Anyone that wants to breed their pet should spend a few days at a local shelter before they move forward. They need to ask themselves if they are prepared to take back these pets if things don't work out. Plus consider how just breeding "one time" can turn into over 1,000 puppies in just one year. It's not worth it! Spay & neuter you pets, it saves lives!

Posted by: Kristen H | October 18, 2011 10:39 AM    Report this comment

Well said, bravo!

Posted by: Terri H | October 18, 2011 10:29 AM    Report this comment

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